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http://educaoaxaca.org/images/solidarity-with-standing-rock-defend-the-land.jpgOaxacan communities, social and civil organizations and independent academics united in the Oaxaca State Organization for Defense of Native Maize wrote this letter to show their support of the Sioux Tribe of Standing Rock in  fight against the Dakota access pipeline:


AN OPEN LETTER OF SOLIDARITY AMONG INDIGENOUS PEOPLE

It is our right to conserve the territories, the cultures and the spirituality which have nourished the lives of the original peoples of the world.

In the face of the violent events taking place since September, 2016, in the territories of the Sioux Nation at Standing Rock, North Dakota, against the Hunkpapa Lakota Nation and other native peoples whose ancestors have long inhabited the banks and adjacent areas of the Missouri River in the United States of America, we, the undersigned, representatives of indigenous and campesino communities, non-governmental organizations, and independent academics of the state of Oaxaca, Mexico, manifest our opposition to the systematic violation of indigenous human rights by the violent imposition of the Dakota Access Pipeline, which affects the territory, water, and culture of the Sioux Tribe at Standing Rock.

http://www.progressive.org/sites/default/public_files/brad-will.jpgTen years ago today, Indymedia reporter Brad Will was killed while filming teacher protests in Oaxaca, Mexico. His case remains unsolved, despite calls for an investigation by members of Congress, and even a temporary delay in U.S. aid.

Bradley Roland Will (June 14, 1970 – October 27, 2006) was an American activist, videographer and journalist. He was affiliated with Indymedia. On October 27, 2006 during a labor dispute in the Mexican city of Oaxaca, Will was shot twice, possibly by government-aligned paramilitaries, resulting in his death.

http://www.londonmexicosolidarity.org/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/portadaFB-AYOT2.jpg?itok=jeHDQJx6September 26 marks the second anniversary of the night student teachers were attacked by police in the city of Iguala, Guerrero. Three students and three bystanders were killed in the attacks and 43 students were disappeared. The case sparked months of angry demonstrations in Mexico that seriously damaged President Enrique Peña Nieto's image both at home and abroad.

“This is one of the worst cases of human rights violations seen in Mexico’s recent history. Two years later, the Mexican government has done very little to help these wounds heal. It is shocking that, despite dedicating significant resources, the Mexican government has not found the students, and that its own officials have obstructed the investigation,” said Maureen Meyer, Senior Associate for Mexico at WOLA.

https://media.licdn.com/mpr/mpr/shrinknp_800_800/AAEAAQAAAAAAAAIWAAAAJDA1ODY3Y2I5LTU2NTAtNDZmYS04MzNhLThjNzZlOWExMjUzNA.jpgHas a corporation ever made you feel vulnerable? Have your rights been ignored? Does it seem that businesses have no oversight? Then this may be of interest to you.In 2011, the United Nations Human Rights Council issued Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights. The principles reiterate that nations must control business activities, that corporations must respect human rights, and that victims must have access to justice. The Council also created the Working Group on Business and Human Rights to put these principles into action. The Working Group will visit Mexico from August 29 to September 7. This visit will be its second to Latin America, after a mission to Brazil in December 2015.

Astrid Puentes Riaño, Co-Executive Director of the Interamerican Association for Environmental Defense (AIDA), writes that "the UN Working Group aims for its visit to be an important event for human rights in Mexico.  We hope its conclusions reflect what the country really needs. We hope that both business and government welcome the visit, take the recommendations seriously, and demonstrate the political will to act on them." Read the article:

http://www.un.org/en/events/indigenousday/assets/img/logo2016.jpgThis year’s theme for the International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples on 9 August focuses on the right to education. The right of indigenous peoples to education is protected by the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, which in Article 14 states that “Indigenous peoples have the right to establish and control their educational systems and institutions providing education in their own languages, in a manner appropriate to their cultural methods of teaching and learning.”

The right of indigenous peoples to education is also protected by a number of other international human rights instruments, including the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development adopted by world leaders in September 2015 and the Sustainable Develop Goal 4 further underline this right, calling for eliminating gender disparities in education and ensuring equal access to all levels of education and vocational training, including for indigenous peoples.

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DENUNCIA OAXACA-01